Thank you, JP Morgan, May I Have Another?

The way that the big investment banks treat their retail customers reminds us of the classic scene from Animal House. No matter how many times they get spanked, the investing public just keeps asking for more.

Today the New York Times details JP Morgan’s practice of “encouraging” their “advisers” to sell JP Morgan’s funds above those of their competitors. Keep in mind, this is something that Morgan Stanley and Citigroup once did, but eventually stopped due to the perceived conflict of interests. If JP Morgan’s advisers truly did have their clients’ best interests in mind, the environment at the bank certainly doesn’t appear to have fostered any sense of responsibility:

While brokers do not receive extra bonuses or commissions on the Chase Strategic Portfolio, some advisers said they had felt pressure to recommend such internal products as part of the intense sales culture. A supervisor in a New Jersey branch recently sent a congratulatory note with the header “KABOOM” to an adviser who had persuaded a client to put $75,000 into the Chase Strategic Portfolio. “Nice to know someone is taking advantage of the best selling day of the week!” he wrote.

JPMorgan also circulates a list of brokers whose clients collectively have with the largest amounts in the Chase Strategic Portfolio. Top advisers have nearly $200 million of assets in the program.

“It was all about the money, not the client,” said Warren Rockmacher, a broker who recently left the company. He said that if he did not persuade a customer to invest in the Chase Strategic Portfolio, a manager would ask him why he had selected something else.

These funds, it’s worth noting, have also been marketed with hypothetical performance numbers in place of actual track records – even when actual track records were available (and were lower than the hypothetical numbers). This isn’t really a new story – it’s one Josh Brown already covered in his book Backstage Wall Street (and revisited again in light of the Times article). But it highlights the problem dealing with the traditional brokerage model – they make money regardless of what happens to their customers. This is a story and a lesson that bears repeating as often and as loudly as necessary until regulatory change steps in to protect customers, or until enough people are aware of the practice that they pull their funds from these money pits.










Speak Your Mind

*

Interested in distributing or reprinting this content? Check out our reprint policy here.

DISCLAIMER

Forex trading, commodity trading, managed futures, and other alternative investments are complex and carry a risk of substantial losses. As such, they are not suitable for all investors.

The entries on this blog are intended to further subscribers understanding, education, and – at times- enjoyment of the world of alternative investments through managed futures, trading systems, and managed forex, and is not intended as investment advice, or an offer or solicitation for the purchase or sale of any financial instrument. Unless distinctly noted otherwise, the data and graphs included herein are intended to be mere examples and exhibits of the topic discussed, are for educational and illustrative purposes only, and do not represent trading in actual accounts. Opinions expressed are that of the author.

*The mention of specific asset class performance (i.e. +3.2%, -4.6%) is based on the noted source index (i.e. Newedge CTA Index, S&P 500 Index, etc.), and investors should take care to understand that any index performance is for the constituents of that index only, and does not represent the entire universe of possible investments within that asset class. And further, that there can be limitations and biases to indices such as survivorship and self reporting biases, and instant history.

The mention of general asset class performance (i.e. managed futures did well, stocks were down, bonds were up) is based on Attain’s direct experience in those asset classes, estimates of performance of dozens of CTAs followed by Attain, and averaging of various indices designed to track said asset classes.

It should be noted that past market performance is not indicative of future market movement.No market data or other information is warranted by Attain Capital Management as to completeness or accuracy, express or implied, and is subject to change without notice.

Managed Futures Disclaimer:

Past Performance is Not Necessarily Indicative of Future Results. The regulations of the CFTC require that prospective clients of a managed futures program (CTA) receive a disclosure document when they are solicited to enter into an agreement whereby the CTA will direct or guide the client’s commodity interest trading and that certain risk factors be highlighted. The disclosure document contains a complete description of the principal risk factors and each fee to be charged to your account by the CTA.